LeftyBassist.com

The online home for southpaw bassists.
It is currently September 22nd, 2017, 8:45 pm




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 35 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: July 2nd, 2012, 10:59 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: October 5th, 2008, 9:45 am
Posts: 623
Every once in awhile I get an urge to give a shout out to great brands that were lefty-friendly back before it was cool to be (oh wait, it still isn't :roll: ). I was talking about Guild the other day (I should probably move my "Guild Pilot" posts from "Southpaw spotted" over to a "Basses" thread), and I feel like talking about BC Rich today. Also posted a couple pics of my modest B.C. Rich collection, from left to right- --

--The "NJ" (Nagoya Japan) series Eagle neck thru bass is from around 1983 (the MM pickup at the bridge was a previuos owner's mod from what was originally a double P configuration). These first neck thru imports made for BC Rich from Japan were very high quality.

--The Mockingbird neck thru and Double P bolt on basses are both custom builds; I haven't come up with any reliable way to date these, but I know that custom builds were hand made to individual customer specs in the LA shop back in the late 70's to mid 80's. I'd guess around 1986 or so for the Double P, and the Mockingbird probably a little earlier). With the exception of the chrome knobs on the Double P, everything is original to both basses--Pickups (Bartolini Hi-A and DiMarzios), electronics and hardware (the vintage Badass bridges, Grover tuners, etc.) is all stuff that was used in production at that time.

Any additional BC Rich thoughts or info welcomed... the company has a fascinating history, and I know there are a few of you guys who have some "Riches" in your collections, correct? I recall "LeftyLoser" had a few very nice old Mockingbirds he was selling and/or hanging onto at one point when I had no cash- otherwise I would have added a couple more to my arsenal....

Below are excerpts from the excellent article: "B.C. Rich Beginnings" - Premier Guitar, October 2011
Where It All Began
B.C. Rich’s origin can be traced to Bernardo’s Guitar Shop at 2716 Brooklyn Avenue, in Los Angeles. In the mid ’50s, Bernado Mason Rico purchased the store from the Candelas guitar shop and opened his namesake store. He didn’t work on the guitars himself—he chose to focus on day-to-day operations—but instead hired luthiers from Paracho, Mexico, which is widely regarded as the guitar capital of that country. Rico helped many of these luthiers gain residence and naturalization as citizens of the United States. Rico’s son Bernardo “Bernie” Chavez Rico, an accomplished flamenco guitarist, did become involved with the guitar making, however.

Father and son brought bodies in from Mexico, had them painted and assembled at the shop for mariachi, classical, and folk musicians. By the early ’60s, folk music had become popular and folk artists started bringing in their acoustic steel-string guitars to the shop for repairs. Word spread, and throngs of musicians like Barry McGuire and David Lindley started bringing in Martins and Gibsons for work and daring modifications, such as disassembling a Martin D-18 and putting in a 12-string neck.

The folk boom led to the shop’s production of steel-string acoustics, which featured Brazilian rosewood back and sides, Sitka spruce tops, and Honduran mahogany necks with Gaboon ebony fingerboards. Although these early guitars were reportedly rated higher than new Martins at the time, they had some minor issues. Because they didn’t have an adjustable truss rod, the guitars were often brought in later to have the fretboard removed and a truss rod installed. They also had very thin spruce tops that sounded nice but were known to crack and move from 1/16" to 1/8" into the soundhole if too much string tension caused the neck to fold into the body. These issues were quickly addressed without question, and problem instruments were repaired or replaced even many years past the one-year warranty.

In 1968, Bernie made his first electric solidbody using a Fender neck. This led to his first attempts at guitar production in the form of about ten Les Paul-shaped guitars and basses modeled after the Gibson EB-3. Around 1972, Bernie and an employee named Bob Hall started developing a model they called the Seagull (which has no connection to the Godin Guitars acoustic brand). It was the company’s first production electric guitar, and it came to market in 1974. Up to that time, the store’s phone greeting was “Bernardo’s Guitar Shop.” One day, Stich answered the phone with, “B.C. Rich,” and some think that’s the moment the company name changed and it became a full-fledged guitar manufacturer with a mission. “B.C. Rich’s intention was to make a production-line custom guitar with high quality and craftsmanship that was very expensive for the day,” says Stich. “In 1977, they were $999 retail—and you were paying more than retail if you could actually find one.”

Although, B.C. Rich was often referred to as a custom shop at the time, it wasn’t custom in the conventional sense of the word. “The guitars were handcrafted, but they were still production guitars. People might request special inlays or maybe Bartolini Hi-A pickups instead of DiMarzios, but basically it was a production-line guitar,” explains Stich. The company had facilities in both California and Tijuana, Mexico. All the workers were from Mexico, and both shops freely interchanged parts. For the electric guitars, Bernie would send wood, fretboards, frets, inlays, glues, and other materials over to Mexico, and then drive down once a month to pick up the assembled guitars, which were then painted and finally assembled in L.A. The steel-string acoustics, however, were made right there in L.A.

Handmade—All the Way Down to the Tools
When Stich says early B.C. Riches were handmade, he means it in the truest sense of the phrase. He recalls that there were no machines in sight inside the shop—only band saws, belt sanders, block planes, spoke shaves, files, and special guitar knives that the luthiers made themselves out of highly carbonized metal. “The guys would literally go out and buy a metal slab that was probably a quarter inch thick, and they would cut it, shape it, sharpen it, and make a handle for it—usually out of mahogany. People would walk in and go, ‘Where’s your machinery?’ and we’d go, ‘Sittin’ right there,’ and point at a knife. Then they’d go into the paint shop and guys would be water-sanding, finishing coats, and buffing by hand. When they cut the blanks, the sides would be glued on and wrapped with cord like in the old days, when they made violins and wrapped them with cords in France in the 1500s. They would tap shims between the cord and the wood to make it as tight as possible for the glue joints, which were always superb. The guitars would go through a process of being marked out with a pencil and a template of the shape of the guitar—we had aluminum templates and later plastic—and then they would do a cutout on a band saw. From there, the necks would be handcarved using what I call a ‘Mexican guitar maker’s knife,’ and they just hacked the [expletive] out of it. It would start out with a hammer and a chisel—bam, bam, bam—making the neck. Then they would go to the knife, and finally to a spoke shave. These guys could knock out a neck in about 20 minutes.”

Because necks were handcarved back then, B.C. Rich could offer personalized profiles. It was common to see big-name rock stars sitting with the late master luthier Juan Hernandez while he hacked away at a neck blank with a knife and spoke shave. Stich recalls that the guitar would go back and forth between Hernandez and the client, who would feel it and maybe say, “Take off a little more right here, a little more there,” until they got it right. After the body and neck were completed, the last stop was the assembly shop—where everything was hardwired. “The parts—the Varitone, the preamp circuitry, etc.—were made by hand,” says Stich. “We would go to the electronics store and buy all the parts we needed, and they would cut up the PCB boards. It was really labor intensive.”

Intricate Circuitry
Noted luthier Neal Moser, who had developed a reputation as the go-to guy for hot-rodding guitar electronics, joined the company in 1974. Over the initial dinner meeting at Bernie’s house, Moser sketched out the circuitry and layout for a new design on a piece of cardboard. He soon went to work for B.C. Rich as an independent contractor. His dinner-table design—which consisted of master volume and tone controls, a built-in preamp, a 6-position Varitone, and coil taps—was implemented on the production Seagull guitar. B.C. Rich’s electric offerings were originally equipped with Guild pickups, but the company later switched to DiMarzios, which Stich says, “added a whole different reality to the guitars. The Guilds had this ’50s or ’60s sound, whereas the DiMarzios had a new sound to them. They also worked better with Moser’s circuitry.”

Wilder and Wilder Shapes
B.C. Rich guitar bodies always pushed the envelope of guitar design, and as the years progressed, the shapes got even more extreme. The Seagull’s toilet-seat-inspired shape was daring for the time, but fairly conservative in hindsight. And though it was well received, the protruding point on the upper body was uncomfortable for some players because it poked into your torso at certain playing angles. This led to the creation of the Eagle, which had a more conventional Strat-like shape, but with the Seagull’s treble-side cutaway. Another version of the Seagull that jettisoned the sharp point was also later produced. In 1975, the company introduced its first radically shaped guitar, the Mockingbird, which was inspired by a shape drawn by Johnny “Go Go” Kallas and named by Moser.

In 1977, while Bernie was in Japan, Moser went into the woodshop one day and crafted the company’s edgiest design to date—the 10-string Bich. According to Stich, when Bernie returned to the shop and saw the new project, he got upset and yelled “You guys don’t design guitars without me!” The model’s name stems from a trip Moser and his wife made to the county fair. “They noticed some girls wearing charms on their necklaces that read ‘Rich Bitch.’ They agreed that would be an ideal name,” recalls Stich. “Of course, the ‘T’ was dropped.” That model led to the 6-string Bich and the Son of a Rich, an American-made economy version with a bolt-on neck and bodies machine-made by Wayne Charvel. Initially, there was some concern that dealers would reject the guitar based on its risqué name, but after some dealers from Utah—the most conservative state in the Union—gave it the green light, the name stuck. Introduced in 1981, the company’s next guitar, the Warlock, featured a shape inspired by the Bich—and it went on to become one of the most iconic B.C. Riches. The Widow, designed by Blackie Lawless, and the Stealth, designed by Mockingbird user Rick Derringer, followed in 1983.

By that point, B.C. Rich had a complete catalog of distinctive instruments, and it wasn’t long before overseas companies like Aria were creating B.C. Rich knock-offs. Bernie went into survival mode and flew to Japan with Hiro Misawa to set up the B.C Rich NJ series, which stood for “Nagoya, Japan,” where they were made. “We knocked-off ourselves, basically,” says Stich. “The first time we went to Frankfurt [Musikmesse musical instrument trade show], we had really nice guitars and people came up to us and said, ‘Hey, that’s a copy of the Aria guitar.’ We were, like, ‘You’re kidding, right?’”

The company’s first Japanese guitars were labeled B.C. Rico and did not feature the NJ series designation. Trouble appeared soon after when Rico Reeds (makers of saxophone and clarinet reeds) sued B.C. Rich for patent infringement on the name. “We were, like, ‘Wait a minute! Rico is the guy’s real name.’ But instead of spending money on a big litigation and lawsuits, we just [substituted] an ‘h’ at the end of the name,” recalls Stich.

B.C. Rich continued to produce more unique-looking guitars such as the Ironbird, the Wave, and the Fat Bob, which was shaped like a Harley-Davidson motorcycle’s gas tank. However, to capitalize on the resurgence of the Fender Stratocaster’s popularity in the mid ’80s, B.C. Rich introduced the ST series—a straightforward double-cutaway that was a noticeable departure from the company’s legacy of flashy shapes.

The Fame Game
The first pivotal point in B.C. Rich’s rise to widespread recognition came in 1976, when sound engineer Bob “Nite Bob” Czaykowski picked up a maple-bodied Mockingbird—the first one ever made—for Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry. “All of a sudden, B.C. Rich was on the map,” says Stich. “In my opinion, if it wasn’t for Nite Bob, B.C. Rich would have been another flash-in-the-pan guitar company.”

The wild shapes of B.C. Rich guitars also attracted the attention of the producers of This Is Spinal Tap. Stich put some guitars together for the production, and in so doing, unwittingly became responsible for adding a new phrase to popular music’s cultural lexicon. “There was a meeting in my office to loan the guitars and basses. I was playing with a volume knob Larry DiMarzio gave me that went to 11. I showed it to them and explained why it went to 11.” The producers used it in one of the movie’s classic scenes, and the idiom soon became immortalized in the vernacular of guitarists and rock fans the world over.

The Changing of the Guard
In the mid 1980s, B.C. Rich saw major changes that would send the company in a new direction. Stich left in ’84 and Moser left in ’85. In ’87, Bernie entered into a marketing agreement with Randy Waltuch’s Class Axe, allowing them to market and distribute Rave, Platinum, and NJ Series guitars. A year later, Bernie licensed the Rave and Platinum names to Class Axe, which essentially took over importing, marketing, and distribution of the foreign-made lines. Soon after, complete control was turned over to Class Axe and B.C. Rich’s custom shop was disbanded. Class Axe licensed the name B.C. Rich in 1989.

During this period, quality control nosedived and the B.C. Rich name suffered. Bernie was out of the company picture for a few years, and during that time he produced Mason Bernard guitars— handmade acoustic-electrics and Strat-shaped electrics. In 1993, Bernie regained ownership of B.C. Rich and made a concerted effort to restore the company’s name. Sadly, on December 3, 1999, he passed away from a sudden heart attack. Subsequently, the company went to his son Bernie Jr., who turned over control to the Hanser Music Group in 2001 and began making guitars under the Rico Jr. name. However, he is involved with some current B.C. Rich custom-shop guitars.

As part of its recently revamped custom operation, B.C. Rich also brought famed builder Grover Jackson aboard to work on the Gunslinger Handcrafted series. The company continues to evolve and release visually striking designs that, like its legacy designs, appeal to both younger metal players and elder statesman of the genre like Slayer’s Kerry King. Its Pro X Bich model was voted Best of NAMM in the electric guitar category at NAMM 2011.


Attachments:
BC Rich Collection 1.jpg
BC Rich Collection 1.jpg [ 225.38 KiB | Viewed 9945 times ]
BC Rich Collection 2.jpg
BC Rich Collection 2.jpg [ 242.28 KiB | Viewed 9945 times ]


Last edited by Carmine on July 2nd, 2012, 3:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: July 2nd, 2012, 2:05 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 15th, 2009, 8:03 am
Posts: 1367
That 'Bird is tits!!

:twisted:

Absolutely LOVE the "one knob" with pickup selector... all three are, of course, cool... but that one really grabs me.

Very cool post!

_________________

F Bass BN5 • ZON Legacy Elite 5 • ZON Sonus Elite 5 Fretless • ZON Sonus BG5 • Fender Custom Shop '64 NOS Jazz • Fender Custom Shop '75 NOS Jazz • Fender ADE Precision • Music Man SR4


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: July 5th, 2012, 11:49 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: October 5th, 2008, 9:45 am
Posts: 623
Thanks! Yes, I love the simplicity of that Mockingbird. Given that was the era when B. C. Rich was known for putting a zillion switches and knobs on everything, you could almost call it the "Anti- B. C. Rich"! :lol:, but that's the beauty of a custom order.

I know pjmuck has at least one and (possibly still two) absolutlely gorgeous basses- an Eagle and a Mockingbird (see pic- I think these 2 are his). If he sees this thread, maybe he'll give us the story on them...

Also, this incredible Wave bass (see bottom pic) is still isted on Lefty Loser's site- but it dates back to 2011, he was asking $2999.99 at the time. Don't know if he still has it or not...


Attachments:
hpim7376.jpg
hpim7376.jpg [ 81.14 KiB | Viewed 9878 times ]
bc_rich_wave_bass_299999_20110104_1967360969.jpg
bc_rich_wave_bass_299999_20110104_1967360969.jpg [ 195.69 KiB | Viewed 9878 times ]
Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: July 5th, 2012, 2:10 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: November 26th, 2008, 6:14 am
Posts: 2755
Location: Oahu, Hawaii
Back in 2002 I was recording an album with a friend, and having my custom bass (avatar picture) being made by Ron Blake, who worked for Ed Roman at the time. I was using my '97-'98 Carvin LB75 for the sessions, and one song was a minor blues song in C#. Listening to the playback, it was apparent that the Carvin had intonation problems, particularly in that key. I was talking to Ed during that time about some of the build details on my new bass, and mentioned the problems I was having with the Carvin, and he volunteered to send me an Eagle-style BC Rich bass to play on the recordings. Wish I'd taken pictures of it at the time, but as I recall it looked similar to pjmuck's Eagle in the wood and finish, had a fin on it not quite as radical as the Mockingbird, and had white p-bass style pickups. It had a lot of switches and knobs on it, and the one knob that was great was the "multi-tone" knob, for lack of a better description. I think it may have been similar to this: http://www.stellartone.com/Page.asp?NavID=147 , ToneStyler knob from Stellartone.

It was a very solid bass, somewhat heavy, but it had a great tone! Wasn't the type of body style I was interested in, but it was a great sounding bass, with a good neck and action. Knowing what I know now about lefty basses, I should have bought it!

_________________
R&B Stretch Bass, Walter Woods 1000w Green-Light Stereo Amp, AccuGroove El Whappo and TR112, assorted axes, amps, cabs...
http://www.myspace.com/thestrangershawaii


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: July 6th, 2012, 7:25 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 9th, 2008, 7:46 am
Posts: 2889
Location: West Orange, NJ
Sorry if I'm late to the party. :D

Stunning collection as always, Carmine. I really dig that cream Eagle. :)

Yes, the 2 BC Riches Riches Carmine posted are indeed mine, and I acquired them from master Rich collector Tom Tyner at Lefty Loser Guitars about 5 years ago. Tom's THE source for vintage BC Rich stuff, as not only does he currently have that Wave bass in stock (which he was ONLY asking $2000 for 5 years ago), but he's had numerous lefty Warlocks, an Ironbird, and a Gunslinger in stock at various points too.

The early handmade Ricos are, IMO, some of the best basses ever made, and possess one of the most playable comfy necks. This first one is a '77 Eagle/Bodine bass, and the rarest of my Riches. (Or the "Richest" of my BCs. ;) I've yet to see another lefty). The Eagle is my favorite Rich design since it's a bit more conventional than the crazy pointy metal designs of their later years, and also the most ergonomically comfortable, IMO. (BC Rich gets high marks for challenging conventional aesthetics of guitar design, but they rarely concern themselves with balance or playability, IMO). It's all original, koa body with maple "stingers", neck thru, and still features the earlier Sergio Zuniga PUPs carried over from the first Bodine basses, with the only difference between the Bodines and the Eagles being the addition of maple stripes:

Image

And, of course, the multitude of switches that still confuses. The Zuniga PUPS are okay. There's one setting on this bass that's a preamp boost and it's so hot it basically overdrives your amp, and not in a musical way. Believe it or not, it was intended that way. Rico wised up by adding the P style DiMarzios in later editions. Some famous Eagle bass players include Bernard Edwards (Chic) and John McVie (Fleetwood Mac).

Next up is a 1979 TJ Long horn Mockingbird (pictured alongside the Eagle), another one of my favorite BC Rich body designs, if not ergonomically challenging like the most Riches I've played. Made in Tijuana, Mexico, though still considered a USA Made instrument to collectors. (Or so I'm told). This is the "TJ" Mockingbird body design unique to the BCR plant in Tijuana, featuring a longer narrower lower horn. There were 3 different Mockingbird body designs offered simultaneously, but the long horn ones were made presumably to counteract neck dive. Truth be told, my '80 shorthorn Mockingbird balances better, as it has a slightly longer upper horn (not by much, but enough to make a noticeable difference), and thus the first fret can feel a mile away on these. (But since I picked up one of those Heads Up straps my poorly balanced basses are a pleasure to play now). This one also has an 11(!) position varitone knob vs. the 6 position on my other BC Rich basses, all guarantee you'll get lost trying to find your way out of it's endless tonal possibilities.. :lol:

Image

And finally, a 1980 short horn Mockingbird. Again, neck thru koa body with maple stingers. Made at BCR North in El Monte and was made in July of 1978 despite the ’80 serial number beginning. Supposedly BC Rich’s serial number system was designated two years ahead of the actual build date around this time (thus a ’78 would have an ’80 serial #). It came to me with Barts installed, though I've since picked up a pair of late 70's patent DiMarzios to drop back in at some point when I have time.

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: October 20th, 2014, 8:41 am 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
Hello, I love BC Rich basses!!!!!!!!!!!!!! A friend of mine is putting together a book about the history of Bernie & company from it's humble beginnings to 1986. He is excited at the possibility of including the very nice examples presented here in this book! matt.touchard@gmail.com

I've joined as I am a lefthanded bass player - that is I am lefthanded. But when I started in the Orchestra in 6th grade I was told it doesn't matter, thus from humble beginnings on the String Bass I have always played right handed. Right or left, I love BCR.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: October 20th, 2014, 10:16 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: March 4th, 2008, 3:51 pm
Posts: 2518
Location: Pacific Northwest
I'm going to move this to the REVIEWS forum guys, it won't get so readily lost in the mix there.

Great read, thanks Carmine, and everyone else who contributed.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: October 20th, 2014, 2:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
Matti turned me on to this site this morning. So I joined on account of this very thread. The history portion that Carmine posted is about as accurate as anything out there on the net: But, it is based on what a few internet surfers have managed to piece together through the years. I know this because I am one of the guys that helped put all that together. I am adamant with Matti: Let me proofread the book & discuss what I believe should be edited (Sgt Friday: "Just the Facts"). He has travelled the world for interviews & photo sessions with very many famous people that either worked with Bernie or played his axes for millions of fans through the years.
The window for actual content on the book is closing fast. Production is scheduled for 3rd quarter 2016 (who knew content needed such a lead time?). He (& I) want to see the lefthanded axes represented so please consider making pics, stories etc available.

Matti & I are friends. We've sat down & eaten together. The chance to have this fascinating history done right with lefthanded basses included is upon us! This is the update I got this afternoon:



Matt Touchard


3:16 PM (37 minutes ago)


to Matt


re: BC Rich Vintage Book
Friendly Reminder for Inclusion of Content


* FINAL REQUEST *


Hello all,


I'm into the third phase of pre-production and things have rapidly escalated so I am sending this reminder to anyone that wishes to participate with any / all submissions, to please contact me soon as the window for content will be closing fast.


If you have anything you deem worthy for the book (Pre-1985 only), please contact me and we'll talk about your inclusion.


FINAL Request for Submissions for the following:


1) Instruments made before 1985 only

If you are the owner of an unusual guitar (acoustic/electric/bass/etc) and want it to be considered,

please let me know. I will help guide you with photography and what may be best for your guitar.

Note: I have Pro Photos of well over 300 vintage instruments already, so if you'd like to see yours

in this book, NOW is the time to submit yours.



2) One-off / Custom Instruments

Please inquire as to the best way we can feature your instrument.

I have several Prototypes, custom pieces, one-of--a-kind instruments already included.

Currently, stories are being developed around these. I cannot use everything, but perhaps you

have a "must" for the Book? Contact me ASAP. There will be many "First Builds" in the book.

Don't forget yours.



3) Historically-Relevant Content

The Book is fast approaching 350 pages. With hundreds of photos, documents and items already

slated for inclusion, there is limited availability and space if you have anything that helps tell the

story of the early era. This can be photographs, documents, items, etc.

I can work with you to photograph or scan anything in your possession. Please inquire.



4) The International Map

As you may know, I'm also putting together a double page spread in the Book that will showcase the

wide range of vintage BC Rich aficionados. So if you have nothing to satisfy Items 1, 2 or 3... no problem!

But send a photo of yourself with your vintage BC Rich anyway and state where you are in the world

and I'll put you "On The Map"!



This Book will be the only book that the vintage BCR aficionado will ever need.

While the Book cannot possibly show everything of the BCR history nor every guitar built, the vast amount of content, images and personally-collected Interviews will put the book between 372 and 450 pages - a Massive Volume! Some spectacular surprises are in store for all of you!


So get your submissions ready or contact me as soon as possible and I will help you work through an easy way for submitting your content.


Thank you

Matti










PS: please let your peers, colleagues, friends in the vintage BCR community know that FINAL SUBMISSIONS are closing soon. Now is the time.




ONCE THE BOOK CLOSES for submissions, that's it. There will be no further extension.





















MATT TOUCHARD
Creative Director • Designer • Image Consultant • Writer



i PHONE 504 388 8985




http://be.net/touchard

www.tellyawards.com/silver/club/members ... =1&id=9547

www.linkedin.com/pub/matt-touchard/26/667/649








PEOPLE TO WATCH :: Graphic Design USA Magazine / NYC
TOP DESIGNERS :: USA + North America :: GDUSA
PEOPLE TO WATCH :: New Orleans Magazine
PEOPLE SEEN AND NOTED :: GDUSA / North America
SILVER COUNCIL / JUDGE :: International TELLY Awards

____________________________

AMERICAN GRAPHIC DESIGN AWARDS USA 45-time Recipient
INTERNATIONAL TELLY AWARDS® 22-time International Winner
SILVER COUNCIL TELLY AWARDS® Judges' Panel


INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE VISUAL ARTS

WRITER'S GUILD of AMERICA, West (Registered)
CLIO® Internat'l Award Winner
DAVEY WORLDWIDE DESIGN AWARD®
SUPER REGGIE® : AD PROMO of THE YEAR for the USA
GOLD ADDY® : TV CAMPAIGN of THE YEAR
ACCOLADE AWARDS® Multiple Winner
LUCIE AWARDS® International Art Direction
U.S. WEB AWARDS® Best in Category
SIDC® Best in Show /Judges Overall Choice / Best in Class
AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL® Superior
____________________________

"If there are no Dogs in Heaven, when I die, I want to go where They are..."

IMPORTANT LEGAL INFORMATION: The information transmitted herein is intended only for the use of the
individual or entity to which it is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are not authorized to
disclose, copy, distribute or retain this message or any part of it and are prohibited from the preceding.
It may contain information which is confidential and/or covered by legal, professional or other privilege.
If you are not the intended recipient of this transmission, please contact the sender and delete the material,
including any attachments, from any computer or peripheral device. We, the sender accept no liability
for the completeness or accuracy of this communication as it has been transmitted over a public network.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: October 21st, 2014, 9:35 am 
Offline

Joined: June 19th, 2013, 10:59 am
Posts: 104
Location: New york/ NJ
If you deem it worthy to be in the book i now own Pete's shorthorn mockingbird and I would love to share it for the book. Best bass I've ever used. It's my baby

_________________
'78 BC Rich USA Mockingbird (shorthorn)
'83 Alembic Spoiler

Ampeg amplifiers

All kinds of metal

RIP Pete Steele, Keith Alexander, Cliff Burton, Chuck Schuldiner

Resident BC Rich & Alembic freak


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: October 21st, 2014, 4:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
MetalMilitia wrote:
If you deem it worthy to be in the book i now own Pete's shorthorn mockingbird and I would love to share it for the book. Best bass I've ever used. It's my baby


Absolutely! It's a shorthorn Mockingbird!!!!! That it is left handed just makes it that much cooler!!! Just email Matti with a quick hello & a pic to show what you have. Or if you have a nice clear collection of large pics & a story to go with them then simply go for it. A release form providing your authority to publish them is all that would be left. Easy peasy!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: October 21st, 2014, 10:31 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: November 26th, 2008, 6:14 am
Posts: 2755
Location: Oahu, Hawaii
This has just become an amazingly interesting thread with the inclusion of Brock as a new member, and the announcement of an upcoming book.... Awesome!

_________________
R&B Stretch Bass, Walter Woods 1000w Green-Light Stereo Amp, AccuGroove El Whappo and TR112, assorted axes, amps, cabs...
http://www.myspace.com/thestrangershawaii


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: October 22nd, 2014, 6:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
matt.touchard@gmail.com for inclusion in the book! Lefty basses NEED to be included!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I set up a photo session with a photographer friend (on account of I'm not that steady with a digital camera set on hi-res).
But I bet you can do it yourself ;-)

Here's one of mine (that I took myself) from 1981 that is sure to make the book. (Sorry it is backwards & I can't show the pro pics yet.)
Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: November 14th, 2014, 5:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
Thought I would update you all on where Matt is at concerning the Book!

Matt Touchard wrote
2:18 PM (4 hours ago)

IMPORTANT UPDATE

November 14, 2014 --

I recently returned from another personal visit (Part III) with direct Rico family members, associates, original employees and colleagues for THE BOOK.

In addition to being mesmerized by fantastic stories that have never been shared before (but have now been collected for The Book), I graciously accepted another invitation to return in one month for continued conversations. More interviews have already been scheduled for (Part IV) – a week-long trip and acquisition of additional photos, documents, memorabilia – all underway.

In the coming weeks, I will be busy in the studio with scanning, photographing, cataloguing and archiving over one-hundred and seventy personal, family items. Several vintage photographs date from as far back as the 1920s, providing testimony and provenance to the very origin of the family, their immigration and their namesake guitars.

Furthermore, most of the myths, speculation, hearsay and guesswork as it pertains to the company origins (when founded, where, what it was called, etc. will finally be disclosed, in chronological fashion! I now have (in my possession, direct from The Rico Family), comprehensive, dated official documents, photographs, and more (from the 1920s-1980s) that will refute and repair erroneous and baseless claims that have fostered incorrect dates, names and facts up to this point in time. Indeed, more than 50% of everything you've read from the internet, articles and assorted other dubious 'sources' is –false.

Want to know Bernardo C. Rico's true nickname?
It's not, Bernie.

Did he actually play guitar and play well?
Who painted the first electric guitars?
What is the real story about the first electric guitar – The Seagull?
Is it true that there were six Les Paul style guitars and basses built?
What about the ongoing controversy of Bernie, Sr. and guitar building, at his own hands? True or False?
It will all be in The Book.

When did the first Rico family guitar enterprise or business begin?
Sorry, it's not the 1930s (as recently indicated on several websites).

What were the names of the guitar shop, in sequence and how many names did they use?
You'll get that info in The Book.

When did they really, officially start using the name, B.C. Rich?
I have the documents and everything will be disclosed.

You will not be disappointed!



Stay connected and thank you for all your support as I continue this journey for all of us.



- Matti

MATT TOUCHARD
Creative Director • Designer • Image Consultant • Writer


MOBILE 504 388 8985


http://be.net/touchard


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: November 17th, 2014, 8:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: June 19th, 2013, 10:59 am
Posts: 104
Location: New york/ NJ
Where can I reach Matt? Id love to have my prized posession my mockingbird in the book.

_________________
'78 BC Rich USA Mockingbird (shorthorn)
'83 Alembic Spoiler

Ampeg amplifiers

All kinds of metal

RIP Pete Steele, Keith Alexander, Cliff Burton, Chuck Schuldiner

Resident BC Rich & Alembic freak


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: November 20th, 2014, 9:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
matt.touchard@gmail.com

Go for it! Any peaks here of your precious while we wait?

Here is an custom order of a 76 Seagull II shape done in 82 that is sure to make the book:
Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: December 21st, 2014, 2:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
There is a lefty in the pic below!!! Please get with Matti concerning your BCRs!!!!!!!!

Postby MattiMontreux » Sun Dec 21, 2014 10:52 am

* UPDATE * 20 December 2014 -- Tolochenaz, Switzerland

Stand by for a NEW update shortly.
I'll give everyone a brief discourse on the BCR Vintage Book travels from the last three weeks in the U.S. and Canada. Now in Switzerland with family/friends (and of course, a few diamonds for THE BOOK).

Update coming to you...
Santé. ~Matti

-----------------------------------------------------------------

* UPDATE * 21 December 2014 -- Zermatt, Switzerland

Now in Europe after exhaustive U.S./Canada research and travels spanning 22 days, 14 flights, 11 cities and ten (10) new interviews for The Book: Direct family members and the original craftsmen and colleagues of Bernardo Mason and Bernardo C Rico. Access/scanning and photos of never-seen-before vintage photos of family, work life, artisans at the old shop, instruments and more. Shot 2,200 NEW photos on the road, complemented by 14 hours of audio recordings and 12 hours of HD Digital Video of the interviews.

In-hand discovery and comprehensive, professional photography of several very rare, historic instruments including four early acoustic instruments, three PROTO guitars (two of which I have never seen before), a mint condition double neck BICH 12/6 in Koa/Maple – that according to my records/database, is the 5th or 6th double neck ever built (1978) and has been off the radar for 30+ years; a wonderful, early Koa Eagle bass that was gifted from Bernie to an amazing player, a very unusual built-to-order Eagle, a rare classical guitar and for me, the most exquisite example I have ever seen of quite possibly one of the very few if any, BiCentennial Seagulls still in the U.S., replete with the most accurate, personal and rich story on these fine, ultra-rare guitars.

Documentation (photographic) of the family residences (1930s-60s), all Bernardo's and BCR locations, the hang-outs and eateries where the legendary mexican craftsmen and others at BCR would have their noon meals and often brought famous practitioners of their art (and yes, I had to eat there, too!). Other documentation of noteworthy locations across the U.S. (and specifically California) that help visually illustrate the old history and for this particular episode – culminating with paying respects to Bernardo and Bernie at the Rico family burial sites.

As always, stay connected with me; much more to come.

I'm away for business and on personal break until second week of January 2015.

YOUR LAST CALL FOR SOLICITED SUBMISSIONS IS NOW

No extensions will be granted beyond JANUARY 31, 2015.
So if you've been hesitant, procrastinating, unsure or simply lazy, you have one month if you want anything considered for inclusion. If you know of anyone that has something of historical significance or visual stimulation, please contact them.

---- JANUARY 31, 2015 is THE FINAL DEADLINE FOR ANY / ALL SUBMISSIONS ----


Have a good Christmas, New Year and Holiday. See you in 2015!

Image

Player/Collector of Vintage BCRs.
MattiMontreux

User avatar


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: January 20th, 2015, 8:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
I just bought the bass on the left in order to make certain something lefthanded makes
it into Matti's book. Reservations for inclusion in the book end Jan 31, 2015. Pics I take
for submission may not make it to him by that day. That's OK. He has my signature
that says he can use my pics & he knows that I'll take those pics & send to him just soon
as I can. The bass on the right is also mine. It is arguably the plainest bass they made
in 77. No reason it won't make the book: pics are big & clear plus it is still stock as the
day it was born. Pre-amp knob setscrew is seized on it - or it would look better with a
replacement knob. The point is: times wasting here, get your pics in or thumb through
the only book you'll see that gets to the real story of BCR & A: Wish your axe was included
& / or B: Wish there were more lefties in it......................

Image


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: January 26th, 2015, 1:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
matt.touchard@gmail.com

Seems I haven't made that easy to find. For inclusion in The Book: use the above email.
I've been in touch with the owner of the Wave pictured on this thread & hope he will want
it included. PJMuck, it seems got busy. I really hope his are in The Book as well! It is
important to me that the only documented & correct history of BCRich, a lefty friendly place,
gets the lefty portion well represented!!!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: January 26th, 2015, 2:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 9th, 2008, 7:46 am
Posts: 2889
Location: West Orange, NJ
I haven't forgotten about Matt, so I'll e-mail him.

I pulled my 2 Riches last night to photograph. Maybe within the next couple of days as I'm snowed in I'll wrap this up once and for all.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Vintage BC Rich Basses
PostPosted: January 27th, 2015, 8:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 20th, 2014, 7:57 am
Posts: 41
We all get busy PJ. Please know I wasn't picking on you - more like rooting for you!

I'm left handed & like unique things, so I'll share pics of my latest (preview above).
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Bass is an all original CUSTOM 31" scale (15.5" nut to 12th fret). 30 1/2" scale I've seen & played (they were 15.25"
nut to 12th fret). Gonna have to call this 1 of 1. Enjoy :D


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 35 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group  
Design By Poker Bandits